Ampers' Twitter Ampers' Facebook
Diverse radio for Minnesota’s communities
18 Unique Stations from Border to Border
Minnesota Arts, Culture and History | Arts

Leading Lady: Julie Kaiser Talks Zelda Fitzgerald and The Last Flapper

Leading Lady: Julie Kaiser Talks Zelda Fitzgerald and The Last Flapper

PLAY | 14:19

The Last Flapper is a one-woman play co-produced by Visions Theatre and Long Lake Theater that retrospects the life of Zelda Fitzgerald. Wife of author F. Scott Fitzgerald, The Last Flapper shines a spotlight on Zelda's personal experiences of creative genius, repression and passionate pursuit of life.

Artist Interview: Pamela Edevold

Artist Interview: Pamela Edevold

“You warm up, just like you would an instrument, and then you get going… and I paint until I just can’t see anymore.” Pamela Edevold:

Self-taught portrait artist Pamela Edevold began her journey as a profesisonal portrait artist when she was eighteen years old. Sketching and selling portraits in the park evolved into commission work and eventually she would create portraits from photographs sent to her in the mail. Colored pencils were her medium of choice for more than 20 years. After a brief hiatus from portrait work, she returned to her easel with a curiosity to experience other mediums. Acrylics have become her new passion. Incorporating this new medium into her portraits has inspired experimentation and a new wonder into her works.

PLAY | 08:22
Artist Interview: Debbie Center

Artist Interview: Debbie Center

“You live your passion and stuff happens… things that come as naturally as breathing, I just, I have to do them.” – Debbie Center:
Lake life inspires Debbie Center’s artistic life. She loves all that the natural world of northern Minnesota has to offer and relishes in exploring the outdoors – particularly the beauty out the back door of her Nevis, MN home. A musician and photographer, Debbie incorporates the woods and waters into her artistic endeavors, capturing lake life in images and film while meshing bird calls and natural harmonies into her music.

PLAY | 11:22
Frozen River Film Fest 2019: Kidtasia and Big Women

Frozen River Film Fest 2019: Kidtasia and Big Women

On this episode of Art Beat we go once again to the Frozen River Film Festival to talk to Director/Animator Robert Jersak. Two of Robert’s films were included in the festival this year. The first film, Kidtasia, is an animated short using only music that Robert’s daughter had made on his tablet. The second film, Big Women is a fun play on the themes of the book Little Women. We talked to Robert about his inspiration for these films as well as the themes and his artistic process. Original air date: 03/12/19.

PLAY | 16:53
Around the U of M

Around the U of M

On this episode of the podcast, we look at the goings on around our very own University of Minnesota- Twin Cities campus.
Shoe Tree QoTW by Casey McCabe 1:11
Shoveling Snow by Nathan Fervoy 3:56
Rural Design by Rose O’Neil 12:06

PLAY | 27:00
Edward Ojard

Edward Ojard

At 10 years old, this Two Harbors pianist might be the youngest person ever to grace our studio. He’s been playing piano since age 3 and composing his own music since he was 4. In addition to his originals, his repertoire ranges from classical to ragtime (he’s been a member of The Lake Superior Ragtime Society since he was 7) to pop covers. He released his second album on March 2 at Beaner’s Central in Duluth; we got a preview when he joined us on March 1.

PLAY | 21:49
The Big Wu

The Big Wu

This legendary Minnesota jam band got its start in Northfield in the early ’90s and went on to earn a devoted fanbase. They recently released a new album, We are Young We are Old. We found out more and heard some tunes when band members Mark Joseph, Terry VanDeWalker, and Chris Castino joined us for a stripped-down session on March 1. They performed a full-band CD release show the same night at the Red Herring Lounge in Duluth and on March 2 at Papa Charlie’s at Lutsen, plus an acoustic trio show at Papa Charlie’s March 3.

PLAY | 39:35
Frozen River Film Fest 2019: Beneath The Ink and Wolf House

Frozen River Film Fest 2019: Beneath The Ink and Wolf House

On this episode of Art Beat, we continue our coverage of Frozen River Film Festival. First, we’ll hear from Cy Dodson, director of Beneath the Ink. Beneath the Ink documents an Appalachian tattoo artist and his offer to remove obscene tattoos from former hate group members for no charge.
Next, we’ll hear from Nick Clausen, director of Wolf House. Wolf House tells the story of an artistically vibrant and unique home in Minneapolis and its recent sale. Original air date: 03/05/19.

PLAY | 17:14
Indian Horse: A Conversation with Actor Ajuawak Kapashesit

Indian Horse: A Conversation with Actor Ajuawak Kapashesit

“… Having people that represent you on screen is a luxury that most native people never really get…It’s typically in the 1700s and 1800s in a nondescript tribe where a lot of the time we’re background characters, not the important focus of the story… Film has a great opportunity to create a lot of empathy… If you’re a non-native person coming to this film, you get into that reality of the historical context of why native people have been disenfranchised and what’s going on in those communities and how certain people’s trauma has manifested in certain ways…It’s very exciting to give people that opportunity to see the world from a different point of view.” – Ajuawak Kapashesit

PLAY | 11:08
Barry Babcock: The Bonga Family in MN History

Barry Babcock: The Bonga Family in MN History

“The stories of the Bongas, all of them, are so compelling and they’re so intertwined with early Minnesota history…at nearly every treaty that was made with both the Ojibwe and the Dakota, a Bonga served as an interpreter….My book, I think, is going to rock Minnesota history a little bit, well, maybe more than a just a little bit. ” – Barry Babcock

PLAY | 12:59
Neither Wolf Nor Dog: A conversation with Kent Nerburn

Neither Wolf Nor Dog: A conversation with Kent Nerburn

“….I really came to discover two things. The first one was how incredibly misrepresented the native experience had been in our historical narrative. And secondly, that the Native Americans had so much to teach us all about the way to live, basic values that are inherent in native culture… the valuation of the elders, the larger understanding of family, the belief that there is a spiritual dimension to life that has to be acknowledged at all points, and it just goes on and on…I loved my time on Red Lake… and really took it on as using the skills that I have to try to bring the native experience and native values into the general, public discourse and the books and the film are, sort of, one way of doing that.” – Kent Nerburn

PLAY | 19:38

Supporters

Steve Rummler Hope Network